Your Shopping Bag

APRIL 27TH, 2021

Our inspirations from week three of the New BBC2 show ‘All that glitters’.

In this week bestseller challenge the contestants had to create a cocktail ring, while in the bespoke challenge they were asked to design a striking stage-worthy bib necklace - both using alternative materials.
APRIL 27TH, 2021

Our inspirations from week three of the New BBC2 show ‘All that glitters’.

In this week bestseller challenge the contestants had to create a cocktail ring, while in the bespoke challenge they were asked to design a striking stage-worthy bib necklace - both using alternative materials.
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1850–1775 B.C. — Egypt, gold, carnelian, turquoise, faience — Depictions of Egyptians presenting broad collars and other items of jewellery to deities are often found on temple walls. This piece was found in a tomb of a woman called Senebtisi, dating back to the 12th Dynasty. It is possible that it was a ritual offering and not intended for wearing. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
12th–14th century — Peru, shell, stone, cotton — Throughout history South American civilisations have prised the tiny reddish-orange sells of the Spondylus or Thorny Oyster as it is commonly known. in fact, to some it was more precious a material than silver or gold. This ceremonial collar has a bold simplicity that allows these alternative materials to stand out, while also evoking a powerful statement. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
17th century — Nepal, Gilt copper, semiprecious stones — Created for the royal family of the Malla dynasty of Nepal, this collar would have been worn for rituals and during prayer. The outermost ring contains thirteen images of deities, crafted by the finest Newari artists.
19th century — Turkmenistan, metal, stones — Turkman jewellery was crafted both for cosmetic and spiritual reasons. Different gems were thought to have unique effects on their wearers, for example carnelians and silver were worn to ward off death and disease, while turquoise was worn as a symbol of purity. Image courtesy of The MET
20th century — England, Silver, Tahitian pearls, taxidermy pheasant claws — Created for Alexander McQueen’s AW 2001-02 collection What a Merry-Go Round, this couture necklace features 59 dried pheasant claws and 23 cascading fringes of 645 grade AAA Tahitian pearls, combing to create a sight that is at once macabre and beautiful.

Bespoke — Cocktail rings

The origins of the cocktail ring can be traced back to 1920s Prohibition era America, when women’s rights changed dramatically with freedom of expression being celebrated. These oversized rings are the epitome of over-the-top glamour and are designed and worn to attracted attention.

The Shaun Leane bespoke archive includes many examples - from the impressive Luna rings, generously set with large hand cut gemstones, to the Poison Heart and ceramic Tusk rings with ingenious hidden compartments. Each of these designs are sure to create a powerful statement wherever they are worn.
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Solitaire ring — 2009 — Gold, 7ct cognac diamond, black diamonds
Poison ring — 2005 — White gold, diamonds
Luna ring — 2009 — White gold, rubies, carved rhodolite
Tribal deco ring — 2008 — White gold, black diamonds, white diamonds, tsavorites, cabochon hematite & quartz
Tusk ring — 2019 — Gold, black diamonds, ceramic
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Solitaire ring — 2009 — Gold, 7ct cognac diamond, black diamonds
Poison ring — 2005 — White gold, diamonds
Luna ring — 2009 — White gold, rubies, carved rhodolite
Tribal deco ring — 2008 — White gold, black diamonds, white diamonds, tsavorites, cabochon hematite & quartz
Tusk ring — 2019 — Gold, black diamonds, ceramic
“There is a certain confidence and energy that comes with wearing a cocktail ring, unmatched by any other jewel.”
SHAUN LEANE
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