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May 18th, 2021

Our inspirations from week four of the New BBC2 show ‘All that glitters’.

In the final episode of the season, working with 18ct gold the remaining contestants had to create a pair of stand-out drop earrings, followed by their own version of a Maang Tikka – a traditional Indian bridal headpiece.
May 18th, 2021

Our inspirations from the final of BBC2’s show ‘All that glitters’.

In the final episode of the season, working with 18ct gold the remaining contestants had to create a pair of stand-out drop earrings, followed by their own version of a Maang Tikka – a traditional Indian bridal headpiece.
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3rd century B.C — Greece, gold — A tiny figure of Nike (the personification of victory) driving two horses is set amid the floral design above the boat-shaped forms on these extraordinarily elaborate ancient Greek earrings. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
6th century — Korea, gold — Gold earrings were worn by both men and women of the Silla and Gaya elite. Goldsmith techniques on display here range from simple hammering to the more complex method of granulation, in which tiny gold beads were adhered to the surface to create intricate designs. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
19th century — Italy, gold, shell — Made to catch the eye, these earrings feature intricately carved shell cameos featuring billing doves, yet the relatively flimsy fittings of stamped gold filigree suggest that this was costume jewellery, not meant to be worn often. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
19th century — America, gold, diamonds, enamel — Beauty and practicality are combined in these diamond drop earrings with removable “coach covers.” The spherical, hinged covers are coated with black enamel and snap closed to conceal and protect the valuable diamonds while the wearer is traveling. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
20th century — England, silver — Created for Alexander McQueen’s SS 1996 collection The Hunger, the Tusk earring has become an icon of the house. The elongated silhouette echoes the elegant curves and lines found n nature, while also evoking the fierceness of tribal body adornment.

Bespoke – extraordinary headpieces

Throughout his time collaborating with close friend Lee Alexander McQueen, Shaun created truly iconic silhouettes that redefined the aesthetic of catwalk jewellery. Blurring the lines between fashion and traditional goldsmithing, together they challenged the preconceptions of what a jewel could be.

These headdresses are some of the most striking pieces that Shaun created for McQueen; from the star and moon, inspired by intricate Victorian brooches; the organic splendour of the Joan of Arc headdress; to the gemstone encrusted bird’s nest and eagle skull headdresses made in collaboration with master milliner Philip Treacy.
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Star headdress — Created for Alexander McQueen — In Memory of Elizabeth Howe, AW07 — Silver, blue topaz
Moon headdress — Created for Alexander McQueen — In Memory of Elizabeth Howe, AW07 — Silver, moonstone
Joan headdress — Created for Alexander McQueen —Joan of Arc, AW98 — Silver, natural electroformed roses, garnet
Birds Nest headdress — Created for Alexander McQueen in collaboration with Philip Treacy — The Widows of Culloden, AW06 — Silver, blue topaz, smoky quartz, taxidermy bird wings
Eagle Skull headdress — Created for Alexander McQueen in collaboration with Philip Treacy — The Widows of Culloden, AW06 — Silver, smoky quartz, black spinel, feathers
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Solitaire ring — 2009 — Gold, 7ct cognac diamond, black diamonds
Poison ring — 2005 — White gold, diamonds
Luna ring — 2009 — White gold, rubies, carved rhodolite
Tribal deco ring — 2008 — White gold, black diamonds, white diamonds, tsavorites, cabochon hematite & quartz
Tusk ring — 2019 — Gold, black diamonds, ceramic
“To me a drop earring is one of the most seductive pieces of jewellery, its graceful movement entices the onlooker to the beauty of the wearer.”
SHAUN LEANE
Our gold collections have a weight and tactility that is often absent from modern jewellery, a refusal to compromise that you can feel in every piece. This focus on quality of materials allows our goldsmiths to maintain the energy of line and elegant flow synonymous with the House.
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