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APRIL 20TH, 2021

Our inspirations from week two of the New BBC2 show ‘All that glitters’.

Challenge one tasked the contestants with creating a chain collar, while the bespoke challenge focused on the intricacies of making a sweetheart brooch.
APRIL 20TH, 2021

Our inspirations from week two of the New BBC2 show ‘All that glitters’.

Challenge one tasked the contestants with creating a chain collar, while the bespoke challenge focused on the intricacies of making a sweetheart brooch.
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19th century — England, gold, pearls, rock crystal, painted ivory — So-called Lover’s Eye jewellery was fashionable throughout the first half of the 19th century. Associated with purity and tears, pearls were frequently set into the frames of these miniatures and added a commemorative, memorial aspect to the jewellery. Image Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
19th century — Archaeological-style brooches were popular as shawl pins thoughout the Victorian era. Their designs were based on the magnificent celtic ring brooches of the 7th and 8th centuries, such as the Royal Tiara Brooch. This is a copy of that brooch that was created for the Great Exhibition in 1851. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum
19th century — Italy, gold, glass — Micromosaic is an ancient decorative artform that had a resurgence in the nineteenth century. Intricate patterns were created that often represented imagery from classical antiquity. Here the crux quadrata is depicted, origination from the fourth century. Image Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
19th century — England, gold, diamonds, painted ivory — This portrait jewel is comprised of a miniature painting on ivory covered with a thin slice of a diamond, surrounded by brilliant-cut stones. Portrait diamonds such as this are rare, and required great stone-cutting expertise to ensure their radiance. Image Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
19th century — Naturalistic motifs became increasingly popular for jewellery designs in the second half of the nineteenth century. This magnificent brooch was designed by master craftsman René Lalique for Tiffany & Co. This period also marked the first time platinum was used as a material for jewellery on a commercial level, before then it was reserved only for royalty.Image © Victoria and Albert Museum
19th century — Conceived as a dazzling dragonfly with delicate plique-à-jour wings, this brooch epitomizes the Art Nouveau style in both fashion and manufacture. With its translucent wings set en tremblant and its sparking rose-cut diamonds, the present jewel catches the light brilliantly. Image Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Bespoke - Brooches

Some of the House’s most iconic bespoke work has taken the form of brooches; from the macabre beauty of the Tanzanite & Sapphire beetle brooch, with it’s en tremblant mounted rock crystal wings; to the unrivalled majesty of the spectacular White Light.

A common theme for these pieces is the dichotomies of strength and fragility found in nature and its parallels in human experience. Characterised by the presence of delicate floral motifs, anchored by formidable structures and imbued with a sense of strength and menace.
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Fuchsia brooch, 2018 — Silver, diamonds, tsavorites, enamel
Butterfly brooch, 2014 — White gold, black diamonds, white diamonds, fire opals
Lapel brooch with en tremblant mounted beetles, 2013 — Platinum, white gold, aluminium, sapphires, hand-carved tanzanite, hand-carved rock crystal, enamel
Thistle brooch, 2016 — Silver, black diamonds, grade AAA Tahitian pearls
White Light brooch, 2009 — White gold, 40.68ct of D-colour flawless diamonds, opalescent enamel
“A brooch is the purest of jewellery art forms and the ultimate conversation piece”
SHAUN LEANE

Bespoke - Brooches

Some of the House’s most iconic bespoke work has taken the form of brooches; from the macabre beauty of the Tanzanite & Sapphire beetle brooch, with it’s en tremblant mounted rock crystal wings; to the unrivalled majesty of the spectacular White Light.

A common theme for these pieces is the dichotomies of strength and fragility found in nature and its parallels in human experience. Characterised by the presence of delicate floral motifs, anchored by formidable structures and imbued with a sense of strength and menace.
1/5
Fuchsia brooch, 2018 — Silver, diamonds, tsavorites, enamel
Butterfly brooch, 2014 — White gold, black diamonds, white diamonds, fire opals
Lapel brooch with en tremblant mounted beetles, 2013 — Platinum, white gold, aluminium, sapphires, hand-carved tanzanite, hand-carved rock crystal, enamel
Thistle brooch, 2016 — Silver, black diamonds, grade AAA Tahitian pearls
White Light brooch, 2009 — White gold, 40.68ct of D-colour flawless diamonds, opalescent enamel
Silver has been used by jewellers for centuries and is a material that has its own unique qualities and character. Working with silver allows us the opportunity to experiment with scale and boldness of design to create collections that excite, challenge and inspire.
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